ABOUT HENTIES BAY Bartolomeu Dias sailed along the Atlantic coast in 1488. Near the area of today's Henties Bay he discovered such an abundance of fish that he named this coastline Praia das Sardinhas, Coast of Fish. The fresh water source was first discovered by Schutztruppe soldiers in 1886. In 1920, a minerals prospector stayed overnight. After tasting the water he was said to be healed from an affliction.[4] The namesake of the town is major Hendrik "Henty" Stefanus van der Merwe who discovered the place in 1929 while looking for water. He had been hunting a rhinoceros in the arid hinterland of the Namibian coast near the Brandberg in order to collect a reward from a museum in Pennsylvania that was in search of a rhino skeleton. After shooting the rhino and scraping meat from the bones, water resources of the expedition diminished and forced the party to load the decomposing carcass and search for water.[5][6] They chose to head into the direction of the Atlantic coast and reached it close to Cape Cross. From there van der Merwe and his fellows searched southwards for the mouth of Omaruru River. A few miles south of the mouth they discovered a deep sand valley with reed grass growing in it, advertising the presence of fresh water. Van der Merwe liked the place and after delivering the bones and collecting his reward, returned the following Christmas to build a wooden hut in the riverbed. The place became known as Henty se baai (Henty's Bay) and developed into a holiday hideout,[5] mainly because of the abundance of fish at this spot.[4] In 1951 the South–West Africa Administration mandated to South Africa, proclaimed erven in the Omaruru riverbed that were available for rent, but the erection of permanent structures was not allowed. The first shop was established during that time. A lighthouse was erected to guide ships along the dangerous Namibian coast. In the 1960s mining holes were dug after diamonds had been found in the area on a few occasions. A few years later mining was abandoned due to lack of success. In 1966 it was decided that the riverbed must not be settled in, and property north and south of it was sold. A hotel was built one year later, and the town began to develop.[6]
THINGS TO DO AND SEE In and around 
Henties Bay
ZEILA SHIPWRECK Located about 15km south of Henties Bay is this wonderful shipwreck. The Zeila Shipwreck is an offshore fishing vessel that ran aground in 2008. Namibia’s infamous ‘Skeleton Coast’, also nicknamed the "The Land God Made in Anger", and "The Gates of Hell" is a desolate stretch of desert running right to the sea, where the cold Benguela current create strong currents, rough seas, and dense fogs. The latter in particular have been responsible for the thousand or so shipwrecks along the coast. A great photo-op, especially with the roosting birds that have taken up residence on it, the Zeila is a reminder of the power of nature at the ‘End of the Earth’ where lions hunt seals and elephants wade through the surf. The fishing trawler that was sold as scrap metal to an Indian company by Hangana Fishing of Walvis Bay got stranded after it came loose from its towing line while on its way to Bombay, India shortly after it left Walvis Bay.
GALLOWS  Since its earliest years Henties Bay was primarily an informal holiday settlement that gradually attracted more people every December who initially camped in tents but later on set up small informal wooden houses in the so-called valley, an old tribute of the Omaruru River. Because there was no infrastructure or somebody responsible for cleaning services, it was a battle trying to keep the area clean, probably leading to much bickering amongst holiday makers who are responsible for the mess and who should clean it up. Eventually in 1978 two of the first permanent residents of Henties Bay, Frank Atkinson and Willie Cilliers, who respectively settled here in 1969 and 1971, fixed an old tree stump with a rope and noose as a “friendly but firm” warning to keep the town and beach clean – or else….! This gesture is typical of Afrikaner humour and seen as such without any negative connotation reflecting on obscure happenings such as real hangings or slavery (which is, by the way, not part of Namibia’s history). The gallows, an interesting landmark for more than 20 years is probably the most photographed item in Henties Bay. It became a popular tourist attraction and in 2001 the Municipality had the following inscription affixed: Erected in 1978 as an appeal to keep the town and beach clean. Initiated by Frank Atkinson and Willie Cilliers, who respectively settled here in 1969 and 1971 as two of the first permanent residents of Henties Bay.
THE DEAD SEA The turnoff from the C34 is north of Fishermen’s Inn, 300m after the” Cape Cross 20km” sign and is indicated by a heap of rocks with an arrow painted in white. Follow the track for 7.4 km to black volcanic rocks on your right hand side (not marked). Please stop on the track and walk to this outcrop where you can view bright orange crustose lichens growing on the rocks and interesting rock formations. At an old rose quartz mine beautiful pink rose quartz chunks are still to be seen as it was sorted in size, but more interesting is the small outcrop where the rose quartz formation is very clearly visible. The Strathmore South tin mine is an old worked-out mine. Underground water filled up the excavation and due to the presence of various minerals the salinity is very high which causes one to float freely – from there the name “dead sea”. Locals claim it has healing properties. Please take extreme care when moving around the mine as the sediments are very brittle and unstable. From here you can follow any track back to the C34. The main track takes one past three old graves, conjuring up wild tales of miners and their hardship in a merciless desert environment, far from any civilization. This track is NOW graded but please do not exceed 40 km/h as dust is extremely damaging to lichens and the Welwitschia plants

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Retire In Henties Active Aging Resort admin@hentiesbaygolfestate.com marketing@hentiesbaygolfestate.com +264 81 304 1907 For golf enquiries contact: Wolfie Hall +264 81 271 3830 Henties Bay, Erongo Region, Namibia

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About Henties Bay Henties Bay is a coastal town in the Erongo Region of western Namibia. It is located 70 km north of Swakopmund and is an important holiday settlement. 70 kilometres to the north of the town is the seal colony of Cape Cross. The town had 4,720 inhabitants in 2011, up from 3,285 in 2001
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Enjoy Your Life Excellent and Awesome
Bartolomeu Dias sailed along the Atlantic coast in 1488. Near the area of today's Henties Bay he discovered such an abundance of fish that he named this coastline Praia das Sardinhas, Coast of Fish. The fresh water source was first discovered by Schutztruppe soldiers in 1886. In 1920, a minerals prospector stayed overnight. After tasting the water he was said to be healed from an affliction.[4] The namesake of the town is major Hendrik "Henty" Stefanus van der Merwe who discovered the place in 1929 while looking for water. He had been hunting a rhinoceros in the arid hinterland of the Namibian coast near the Brandberg in order to collect a reward from a museum in Pennsylvania that was in search of a rhino skeleton. After shooting the rhino and scraping meat from the bones, water resources of the expedition diminished and forced the party to load the decomposing carcass and search for water.[5][6] They chose to head into the direction of the Atlantic coast and reached it close to Cape Cross. From there van der Merwe and his fellows searched southwards for the mouth of Omaruru River. A few miles south of the mouth they discovered a deep sand valley with reed grass growing in it, advertising the presence of fresh water. Van der Merwe liked the place and after delivering the bones and collecting his reward, returned the following Christmas to build a wooden hut in the riverbed. The place became known as Henty se baai (Henty's Bay) and developed into a holiday hideout,[5] mainly because of the abundance of fish at this spot.[4] In 1951 the South–West Africa Administration mandated to South Africa, proclaimed erven in the Omaruru riverbed that were available for rent, but the erection of permanent structures was not allowed. The first shop was established during that time. A lighthouse was erected to guide ships along the dangerous Namibian coast. In the 1960s mining holes were dug after diamonds had been found in the area on a few occasions. A few years later mining was abandoned due to lack of success. In 1966 it was decided that the riverbed must not be settled in, and property north and south of it was sold. A hotel was built one year later, and the town began to develop.[6]
THINGS TO DO AND SEE In and around 
Henties Bay
Located about 15km south of Henties Bay is this wonderful shipwreck. The Zeila Shipwreck is an offshore fishing vessel that ran aground in 2008. Namibia’s infamous ‘Skeleton Coast’, also nicknamed the "The Land God Made in Anger", and "The Gates of Hell" is a desolate stretch of desert running right to the sea, where the cold Benguela current create strong currents, rough seas, and dense fogs. The latter in particular have been responsible for the thousand or so shipwrecks along the coast. A great photo-op, especially with the roosting birds that have taken up residence on it, the Zeila is a reminder of the power of nature at the ‘End of the Earth’ where lions hunt seals and elephants wade through the surf. The fishing trawler that was sold as scrap metal to an Indian company by Hangana Fishing of Walvis Bay got stranded after it came loose from its towing line while on its way to Bombay, India shortly after it left Walvis Bay.
 Since its earliest years Henties Bay was primarily an informal holiday settlement that gradually attracted more people every December who initially camped in tents but later on set up small informal wooden houses in the so-called valley, an old tribute of the Omaruru River. Because there was no infrastructure or somebody responsible for cleaning services, it was a battle trying to keep the area clean, probably leading to much bickering amongst holiday makers who are responsible for the mess and who should clean it up. Eventually in 1978 two of the first permanent residents of Henties Bay, Frank Atkinson and Willie Cilliers, who respectively settled here in 1969 and 1971, fixed an old tree stump with a rope and noose as a “friendly but firm” warning to keep the town and beach clean – or else….! This gesture is typical of Afrikaner humour and seen as such without any negative connotation reflecting on obscure happenings such as real hangings or slavery (which is, by the way, not part of Namibia’s history). The gallows, an interesting landmark for more than 20 years is probably the most photographed item in Henties Bay. It became a popular tourist attraction and in 2001 the Municipality had the following inscription affixed: Erected in 1978 as an appeal to keep the town and beach clean. Initiated by Frank Atkinson and Willie Cilliers, who respectively settled here in 1969 and 1971 as two of the first permanent residents of Henties Bay.
The turnoff from the C34 is north of Fishermen’s Inn, 300m after the” Cape Cross 20km” sign and is indicated by a heap of rocks with an arrow painted in white. Follow the track for 7.4 km to black volcanic rocks on your right hand side (not marked). Please stop on the track and walk to this outcrop where you can view bright orange crustose lichens growing on the rocks and interesting rock formations. At an old rose quartz mine beautiful pink rose quartz chunks are still to be seen as it was sorted in size, but more interesting is the small outcrop where the rose quartz formation is very clearly visible. The Strathmore South tin mine is an old worked-out mine. Underground water filled up the excavation and due to the presence of various minerals the salinity is very high which causes one to float freely – from there the name “dead sea”. Locals claim it has healing properties. Please take extreme care when moving around the mine as the sediments are very brittle and unstable. From here you can follow any track back to the C34. The main track takes one past three old graves, conjuring up wild tales of miners and their hardship in a merciless desert environment, far from any civilization. This track is NOW graded but please do not exceed 40 km/h as dust is extremely damaging to lichens and the Welwitschia plants
Retire In Henties Active Aging Resort admin@hentiesbaygolfestate.com marketing@hentiesbaygolfestate.com +264 81 304 1907 For golf enquiries contact: Wolfie Hall +264 81 271 3830 Henties Bay, Erongo Region, Namibia
Enjoy Your Life Excellent and Awesome
Bartolomeu Dias sailed along the Atlantic coast in 1488. Near the area of today's Henties Bay he discovered such an abundance of fish that he named this coastline Praia das Sardinhas, Coast of Fish. The fresh water source was first discovered by Schutztruppe soldiers in 1886. In 1920, a minerals prospector stayed overnight. After tasting the water he was said to be healed from an affliction.[4] The namesake of the town is major Hendrik "Henty" Stefanus van der Merwe who discovered the place in 1929 while looking for water. He had been hunting a rhinoceros in the arid hinterland of the Namibian coast near the Brandberg in order to collect a reward from a museum in Pennsylvania that was in search of a rhino skeleton. After shooting the rhino and scraping meat from the bones, water resources of the expedition diminished and forced the party to load the decomposing carcass and search for water.[5][6] They chose to head into the direction of the Atlantic coast and reached it close to Cape Cross. From there van der Merwe and his fellows searched southwards for the mouth of Omaruru River. A few miles south of the mouth they discovered a deep sand valley with reed grass growing in it, advertising the presence of fresh water. Van der Merwe liked the place and after delivering the bones and collecting his reward, returned the following Christmas to build a wooden hut in the riverbed. The place became known as Henty se baai (Henty's Bay) and developed into a holiday hideout,[5] mainly because of the abundance of fish at this spot.[4] In 1951 the South–West Africa Administration mandated to South Africa, proclaimed erven in the Omaruru riverbed that were available for rent, but the erection of permanent structures was not allowed. The first shop was established during that time. A lighthouse was erected to guide ships along the dangerous Namibian coast. In the 1960s mining holes were dug after diamonds had been found in the area on a few occasions. A few years later mining was abandoned due to lack of success. In 1966 it was decided that the riverbed must not be settled in, and property north and south of it was sold. A hotel was built one year later, and the town began to develop.[6]
THINGS TO DO AND SEE In and around 
Henties Bay
Located about 15km south of Henties Bay is this wonderful shipwreck. The Zeila Shipwreck is an offshore fishing vessel that ran aground in 2008. Namibia’s infamous ‘Skeleton Coast’, also nicknamed the "The Land God Made in Anger", and "The Gates of Hell" is a desolate stretch of desert running right to the sea, where the cold Benguela current create strong currents, rough seas, and dense fogs. The latter in particular have been responsible for the thousand or so shipwrecks along the coast. A great photo-op, especially with the roosting birds that have taken up residence on it, the Zeila is a reminder of the power of nature at the ‘End of the Earth’ where lions hunt seals and elephants wade through the surf. The fishing trawler that was sold as scrap metal to an Indian company by Hangana Fishing of Walvis Bay got stranded after it came loose from its towing line while on its way to Bombay, India shortly after it left Walvis Bay.
 Since its earliest years Henties Bay was primarily an informal holiday settlement that gradually attracted more people every December who initially camped in tents but later on set up small informal wooden houses in the so-called valley, an old tribute of the Omaruru River. Because there was no infrastructure or somebody responsible for cleaning services, it was a battle trying to keep the area clean, probably leading to much bickering amongst holiday makers who are responsible for the mess and who should clean it up. Eventually in 1978 two of the first permanent residents of Henties Bay, Frank Atkinson and Willie Cilliers, who respectively settled here in 1969 and 1971, fixed an old tree stump with a rope and noose as a “friendly but firm” warning to keep the town and beach clean – or else….! This gesture is typical of Afrikaner humour and seen as such without any negative connotation reflecting on obscure happenings such as real hangings or slavery (which is, by the way, not part of Namibia’s history). The gallows, an interesting landmark for more than 20 years is probably the most photographed item in Henties Bay. It became a popular tourist attraction and in 2001 the Municipality had the following inscription affixed: Erected in 1978 as an appeal to keep the town and beach clean. Initiated by Frank Atkinson and Willie Cilliers, who respectively settled here in 1969 and 1971 as two of the first permanent residents of Henties Bay.
The turnoff from the C34 is north of Fishermen’s Inn, 300m after the” Cape Cross 20km” sign and is indicated by a heap of rocks with an arrow painted in white. Follow the track for 7.4 km to black volcanic rocks on your right hand side (not marked). Please stop on the track and walk to this outcrop where you can view bright orange crustose lichens growing on the rocks and interesting rock formations. At an old rose quartz mine beautiful pink rose quartz chunks are still to be seen as it was sorted in size, but more interesting is the small outcrop where the rose quartz formation is very clearly visible. The Strathmore South tin mine is an old worked-out mine. Underground water filled up the excavation and due to the presence of various minerals the salinity is very high which causes one to float freely – from there the name “dead sea”. Locals claim it has healing properties. Please take extreme care when moving around the mine as the sediments are very brittle and unstable. From here you can follow any track back to the C34. The main track takes one past three old graves, conjuring up wild tales of miners and their hardship in a merciless desert environment, far from any civilization. This track is NOW graded but please do not exceed 40 km/h as dust is extremely damaging to lichens and the Welwitschia plants
Retire In Henties Active Aging Resort admin@hentiesbaygolfestate.com marketing@hentiesbaygolfestate.com +264 81 304 1907 For golf enquiries contact: Wolfie Hall +264 81 271 3830 Henties Bay, Erongo Region, Namibia
Bartolomeu Dias sailed along the Atlantic coast in 1488. Near the area of today's Henties Bay he discovered such an abundance of fish that he named this coastline Praia das Sardinhas, Coast of Fish. The fresh water source was first discovered by Schutztruppe soldiers in 1886. In 1920, a minerals prospector stayed overnight. After tasting the water he was said to be healed from an affliction.[4] The namesake of the town is major Hendrik "Henty" Stefanus van der Merwe who discovered the place in 1929 while looking for water. He had been hunting a rhinoceros in the arid hinterland of the Namibian coast near the Brandberg in order to collect a reward from a museum in Pennsylvania that was in search of a rhino skeleton. After shooting the rhino and scraping meat from the bones, water resources of the expedition diminished and forced the party to load the decomposing carcass and search for water.[5][6] They chose to head into the direction of the Atlantic coast and reached it close to Cape Cross. From there van der Merwe and his fellows searched southwards for the mouth of Omaruru River. A few miles south of the mouth they discovered a deep sand valley with reed grass growing in it, advertising the presence of fresh water. Van der Merwe liked the place and after delivering the bones and collecting his reward, returned the following Christmas to build a wooden hut in the riverbed. The place became known as Henty se baai (Henty's Bay) and developed into a holiday hideout,[5] mainly because of the abundance of fish at this spot.[4] In 1951 the South–West Africa Administration mandated to South Africa, proclaimed erven in the Omaruru riverbed that were available for rent, but the erection of permanent structures was not allowed. The first shop was established during that time. A lighthouse was erected to guide ships along the dangerous Namibian coast. In the 1960s mining holes were dug after diamonds had been found in the area on a few occasions. A few years later mining was abandoned due to lack of success. In 1966 it was decided that the riverbed must not be settled in, and property north and south of it was sold. A hotel was built one year later, and the town began to develop.[6]
THINGS TO DO AND SEE In and around 
Henties Bay
  •  

 Since its earliest years Henties Bay was primarily an informal holiday settlement that gradually attracted more people every December who initially camped in tents but later on set up small informal wooden houses in the so-called valley, an old tribute of the Omaruru River. Because there was no infrastructure or somebody responsible for cleaning services, it was a battle trying to keep the area clean, probably leading to much bickering amongst holiday makers who are responsible for the mess and who should clean it up. Eventually in 1978 two of the first permanent residents of Henties Bay, Frank Atkinson and Willie Cilliers, who respectively settled here in 1969 and 1971, fixed an old tree stump with a rope and noose as a “friendly but firm” warning to keep the town and beach clean – or else….! This gesture is typical of Afrikaner humour and seen as such without any negative connotation reflecting on obscure happenings such as real hangings or slavery (which is, by the way, not part of Namibia’s history). The gallows, an interesting landmark for more than 20 years is probably the most photographed item in Henties Bay. It became a popular tourist attraction and in 2001 the Municipality had the following inscription affixed: Erected in 1978 as an appeal to keep the town and beach clean. Initiated by Frank Atkinson and Willie Cilliers, who respectively settled here in 1969 and 1971 as two of the first permanent residents of Henties Bay.
Located about 15km south of Henties Bay is this wonderful shipwreck. The Zeila Shipwreck is an offshore fishing vessel that ran aground in 2008. Namibia’s infamous ‘Skeleton Coast’, also nicknamed the "The Land God Made in Anger", and "The Gates of Hell" is a desolate stretch of desert running right to the sea, where the cold Benguela current create strong currents, rough seas, and dense fogs. The latter in particular have been responsible for the thousand or so shipwrecks along the coast. A great photo-op, especially with the roosting birds that have taken up residence on it, the Zeila is a reminder of the power of nature at the ‘End of the Earth’ where lions hunt seals and elephants wade through the surf. The fishing trawler that was sold as scrap metal to an Indian company by Hangana Fishing of Walvis Bay got stranded after it came loose from its towing line while on its way to Bombay, India shortly after it left Walvis Bay.
The turnoff from the C34 is north of Fishermen’s Inn, 300m after the” Cape Cross 20km” sign and is indicated by a heap of rocks with an arrow painted in white. Follow the track for 7.4 km to black volcanic rocks on your right hand side (not marked). Please stop on the track and walk to this outcrop where you can view bright orange crustose lichens growing on the rocks and interesting rock formations. At an old rose quartz mine beautiful pink rose quartz chunks are still to be seen as it was sorted in size, but more interesting is the small outcrop where the rose quartz formation is very clearly visible. The Strathmore South tin mine is an old worked-out mine. Underground water filled up the excavation and due to the presence of various minerals the salinity is very high which causes one to float freely – from there the name “dead sea”. Locals claim it has healing properties. Please take extreme care when moving around the mine as the sediments are very brittle and unstable. From here you can follow any track back to the C34. The main track takes one past three old graves, conjuring up wild tales of miners and their hardship in a merciless desert environment, far from any civilization. This track is NOW graded but please do not exceed 40 km/h as dust is extremely damaging to lichens and the Welwitschia plants
Retire In Henties Active Aging Resort admin@hentiesbaygolfestate.com marketing@hentiesbaygolfestate.com +264 81 304 1907 For golf enquiries contact: Wolfie Hall +264 81 271 3830 Henties Bay, Erongo Region, Namibia
Bartolomeu Dias sailed along the Atlantic coast in 1488. Near the area of today's Henties Bay he discovered such an abundance of fish that he named this coastline Praia das Sardinhas, Coast of Fish. The fresh water source was first discovered by Schutztruppe soldiers in 1886. In 1920, a minerals prospector stayed overnight. After tasting the water he was said to be healed from an affliction.[4] The namesake of the town is major Hendrik "Henty" Stefanus van der Merwe who discovered the place in 1929 while looking for water. He had been hunting a rhinoceros in the arid hinterland of the Namibian coast near the Brandberg in order to collect a reward from a museum in Pennsylvania that was in search of a rhino skeleton. After shooting the rhino and scraping meat from the bones, water resources of the expedition diminished and forced the party to load the decomposing carcass and search for water.[5][6] They chose to head into the direction of the Atlantic coast and reached it close to Cape Cross. From there van der Merwe and his fellows searched southwards for the mouth of Omaruru River. A few miles south of the mouth they discovered a deep sand valley with reed grass growing in it, advertising the presence of fresh water. Van der Merwe liked the place and after delivering the bones and collecting his reward, returned the following Christmas to build a wooden hut in the riverbed. The place became known as Henty se baai (Henty's Bay) and developed into a holiday hideout,[5] mainly because of the abundance of fish at this spot.[4] In 1951 the South–West Africa Administration mandated to South Africa, proclaimed erven in the Omaruru riverbed that were available for rent, but the erection of permanent structures was not allowed. The first shop was established during that time. A lighthouse was erected to guide ships along the dangerous Namibian coast. In the 1960s mining holes were dug after diamonds had been found in the area on a few occasions. A few years later mining was abandoned due to lack of success. In 1966 it was decided that the riverbed must not be settled in, and property north and south of it was sold. A hotel was built one year later, and the town began to develop.[6]
THINGS TO DO AND SEE In and around 
Henties Bay
 Since its earliest years Henties Bay was primarily an informal holiday settlement that gradually attracted more people every December who initially camped in tents but later on set up small informal wooden houses in the so-called valley, an old tribute of the Omaruru River. Because there was no infrastructure or somebody responsible for cleaning services, it was a battle trying to keep the area clean, probably leading to much bickering amongst holiday makers who are responsible for the mess and who should clean it up. Eventually in 1978 two of the first permanent residents of Henties Bay, Frank Atkinson and Willie Cilliers, who respectively settled here in 1969 and 1971, fixed an old tree stump with a rope and noose as a “friendly but firm” warning to keep the town and beach clean – or else….! This gesture is typical of Afrikaner humour and seen as such without any negative connotation reflecting on obscure happenings such as real hangings or slavery (which is, by the way, not part of Namibia’s history). The gallows, an interesting landmark for more than 20 years is probably the most photographed item in Henties Bay. It became a popular tourist attraction and in 2001 the Municipality had the following inscription affixed: Erected in 1978 as an appeal to keep the town and beach clean. Initiated by Frank Atkinson and Willie Cilliers, who respectively settled here in 1969 and 1971 as two of the first permanent residents of Henties Bay.
Located about 15km south of Henties Bay is this wonderful shipwreck. The Zeila Shipwreck is an offshore fishing vessel that ran aground in 2008. Namibia’s infamous ‘Skeleton Coast’, also nicknamed the "The Land God Made in Anger", and "The Gates of Hell" is a desolate stretch of desert running right to the sea, where the cold Benguela current create strong currents, rough seas, and dense fogs. The latter in particular have been responsible for the thousand or so shipwrecks along the coast. A great photo-op, especially with the roosting birds that have taken up residence on it, the Zeila is a reminder of the power of nature at the ‘End of the Earth’ where lions hunt seals and elephants wade through the surf. The fishing trawler that was sold as scrap metal to an Indian company by Hangana Fishing of Walvis Bay got stranded after it came loose from its towing line while on its way to Bombay, India shortly after it left Walvis Bay.
The turnoff from the C34 is north of Fishermen’s Inn, 300m after the” Cape Cross 20km” sign and is indicated by a heap of rocks with an arrow painted in white. Follow the track for 7.4 km to black volcanic rocks on your right hand side (not marked). Please stop on the track and walk to this outcrop where you can view bright orange crustose lichens growing on the rocks and interesting rock formations. At an old rose quartz mine beautiful pink rose quartz chunks are still to be seen as it was sorted in size, but more interesting is the small outcrop where the rose quartz formation is very clearly visible. The Strathmore South tin mine is an old worked-out mine. Underground water filled up the excavation and due to the presence of various minerals the salinity is very high which causes one to float freely – from there the name “dead sea”. Locals claim it has healing properties. Please take extreme care when moving around the mine as the sediments are very brittle and unstable. From here you can follow any track back to the C34. The main track takes one past three old graves, conjuring up wild tales of miners and their hardship in a merciless desert environment, far from any civilization. This track is NOW graded but please do not exceed 40 km/h as dust is extremely damaging to lichens and the Welwitschia plants
Enjoy Your Life Excellent and Awesome
Bartolomeu Dias sailed along the Atlantic coast in 1488. Near the area of today's Henties Bay he discovered such an abundance of fish that he named this coastline Praia das Sardinhas, Coast of Fish. The fresh water source was first discovered by Schutztruppe soldiers in 1886. In 1920, a minerals prospector stayed overnight. After tasting the water he was said to be healed from an affliction.[4] The namesake of the town is major Hendrik "Henty" Stefanus van der Merwe who discovered the place in 1929 while looking for water. He had been hunting a rhinoceros in the arid hinterland of the Namibian coast near the Brandberg in order to collect a reward from a museum in Pennsylvania that was in search of a rhino skeleton. After shooting the rhino and scraping meat from the bones, water resources of the expedition diminished and forced the party to load the decomposing carcass and search for water.[5][6] They chose to head into the direction of the Atlantic coast and reached it close to Cape Cross. From there van der Merwe and his fellows searched southwards for the mouth of Omaruru River. A few miles south of the mouth they discovered a deep sand valley with reed grass growing in it, advertising the presence of fresh water. Van der Merwe liked the place and after delivering the bones and collecting his reward, returned the following Christmas to build a wooden hut in the riverbed. The place became known as Henty se baai (Henty's Bay) and developed into a holiday hideout,[5] mainly because of the abundance of fish at this spot.[4] In 1951 the South–West Africa Administration mandated to South Africa, proclaimed erven in the Omaruru riverbed that were available for rent, but the erection of permanent structures was not allowed. The first shop was established during that time. A lighthouse was erected to guide ships along the dangerous Namibian coast. In the 1960s mining holes were dug after diamonds had been found in the area on a few occasions. A few years later mining was abandoned due to lack of success. In 1966 it was decided that the riverbed must not be settled in, and property north and south of it was sold. A hotel was built one year later, and the town began to develop.[6]
THINGS TO DO AND SEE In and around 
Henties Bay
Located about 15km south of Henties Bay is this wonderful shipwreck. The Zeila Shipwreck is an offshore fishing vessel that ran aground in 2008. Namibia’s infamous ‘Skeleton Coast’, also nicknamed the "The Land God Made in Anger", and "The Gates of Hell" is a desolate stretch of desert running right to the sea, where the cold Benguela current create strong currents, rough seas, and dense fogs. The latter in particular have been responsible for the thousand or so shipwrecks along the coast. A great photo-op, especially with the roosting birds that have taken up residence on it, the Zeila is a reminder of the power of nature at the ‘End of the Earth’ where lions hunt seals and elephants wade through the surf. The fishing trawler that was sold as scrap metal to an Indian company by Hangana Fishing of Walvis Bay got stranded after it came loose from its towing line while on its way to Bombay, India shortly after it left Walvis Bay.
 Since its earliest years Henties Bay was primarily an informal holiday settlement that gradually attracted more people every December who initially camped in tents but later on set up small informal wooden houses in the so-called valley, an old tribute of the Omaruru River. Because there was no infrastructure or somebody responsible for cleaning services, it was a battle trying to keep the area clean, probably leading to much bickering amongst holiday makers who are responsible for the mess and who should clean it up. Eventually in 1978 two of the first permanent residents of Henties Bay, Frank Atkinson and Willie Cilliers, who respectively settled here in 1969 and 1971, fixed an old tree stump with a rope and noose as a “friendly but firm” warning to keep the town and beach clean – or else….! This gesture is typical of Afrikaner humour and seen as such without any negative connotation reflecting on obscure happenings such as real hangings or slavery (which is, by the way, not part of Namibia’s history). The gallows, an interesting landmark for more than 20 years is probably the most photographed item in Henties Bay. It became a popular tourist attraction and in 2001 the Municipality had the following inscription affixed: Erected in 1978 as an appeal to keep the town and beach clean. Initiated by Frank Atkinson and Willie Cilliers, who respectively settled here in 1969 and 1971 as two of the first permanent residents of Henties Bay.
The turnoff from the C34 is north of Fishermen’s Inn, 300m after the” Cape Cross 20km” sign and is indicated by a heap of rocks with an arrow painted in white. Follow the track for 7.4 km to black volcanic rocks on your right hand side (not marked). Please stop on the track and walk to this outcrop where you can view bright orange crustose lichens growing on the rocks and interesting rock formations. At an old rose quartz mine beautiful pink rose quartz chunks are still to be seen as it was sorted in size, but more interesting is the small outcrop where the rose quartz formation is very clearly visible. The Strathmore South tin mine is an old worked-out mine. Underground water filled up the excavation and due to the presence of various minerals the salinity is very high which causes one to float freely – from there the name “dead sea”. Locals claim it has healing properties. Please take extreme care when moving around the mine as the sediments are very brittle and unstable. From here you can follow any track back to the C34. The main track takes one past three old graves, conjuring up wild tales of miners and their hardship in a merciless desert environment, far from any civilization. This track is NOW graded but please do not exceed 40 km/h as dust is extremely damaging to lichens and the Welwitschia plants
Retire In Henties Active Aging Resort admin@hentiesbaygolfestate.com marketing@hentiesbaygolfestate.com +264 81 304 1907 For golf enquiries contact: Wolfie Hall +264 81 271 3830 Henties Bay, Erongo Region, Namibia
HENTIES BAY GOLF RESORT
Enjoy Your Life Excellent and Awesome
THINGS TO DO AND SEE In and around 
Henties Bay
Bartolomeu Dias sailed along the Atlantic coast in 1488. Near the area of today's Henties Bay he discovered such an abundance of fish that he named this coastline Praia das Sardinhas, Coast of Fish. The fresh water source was first discovered by Schutztruppe soldiers in 1886. In 1920, a minerals prospector stayed overnight. After tasting the water he was said to be healed from an affliction.[4] The namesake of the town is major Hendrik "Henty" Stefanus van der Merwe who discovered the place in 1929 while looking for water. He had been hunting a rhinoceros in the arid hinterland of the Namibian coast near the Brandberg in order to collect a reward from a museum in Pennsylvania that was in search of a rhino skeleton. After shooting the rhino and scraping meat from the bones, water resources of the expedition diminished and forced the party to load the decomposing carcass and search for water.[5][6] They chose to head into the direction of the Atlantic coast and reached it close to Cape Cross. From there van der Merwe and his fellows searched southwards for the mouth of Omaruru River. A few miles south of the mouth they discovered a deep sand valley with reed grass growing in it, advertising the presence of fresh water. Van der Merwe liked the place and after delivering the bones and collecting his reward, returned the following Christmas to build a wooden hut in the riverbed. The place became known as Henty se baai (Henty's Bay) and developed into a holiday hideout,[5] mainly because of the abundance of fish at this spot.[4] In 1951 the South–West Africa Administration mandated to South Africa, proclaimed erven in the Omaruru riverbed that were available for rent, but the erection of permanent structures was not allowed. The first shop was established during that time. A lighthouse was erected to guide ships along the dangerous Namibian coast. In the 1960s mining holes were dug after diamonds had been found in the area on a few occasions. A few years later mining was abandoned due to lack of success. In 1966 it was decided that the riverbed must not be settled in, and property north and south of it was sold. A hotel was built one year later, and the town began to develop.[6]
Located about 15km south of Henties Bay is this wonderful shipwreck. The Zeila Shipwreck is an offshore fishing vessel that ran aground in 2008. Namibia’s infamous ‘Skeleton Coast’, also nicknamed the "The Land God Made in Anger", and "The Gates of Hell" is a desolate stretch of desert running right to the sea, where the cold Benguela current create strong currents, rough seas, and dense fogs. The latter in particular have been responsible for the thousand or so shipwrecks along the coast. A great photo-op, especially with the roosting birds that have taken up residence on it, the Zeila is a reminder of the power of nature at the ‘End of the Earth’ where lions hunt seals and elephants wade through the surf. The fishing trawler that was sold as scrap metal to an Indian company by Hangana Fishing of Walvis Bay got stranded after it came loose from its towing line while on its way to Bombay, India shortly after it left Walvis Bay.
 Since its earliest years Henties Bay was primarily an informal holiday settlement that gradually attracted more people every December who initially camped in tents but later on set up small informal wooden houses in the so-called valley, an old tribute of the Omaruru River. Because there was no infrastructure or somebody responsible for cleaning services, it was a battle trying to keep the area clean, probably leading to much bickering amongst holiday makers who are responsible for the mess and who should clean it up. Eventually in 1978 two of the first permanent residents of Henties Bay, Frank Atkinson and Willie Cilliers, who respectively settled here in 1969 and 1971, fixed an old tree stump with a rope and noose as a “friendly but firm” warning to keep the town and beach clean – or else….! This gesture is typical of Afrikaner humour and seen as such without any negative connotation reflecting on obscure happenings such as real hangings or slavery (which is, by the way, not part of Namibia’s history). The gallows, an interesting landmark for more than 20 years is probably the most photographed item in Henties Bay. It became a popular tourist attraction and in 2001 the Municipality had the following inscription affixed: Erected in 1978 as an appeal to keep the town and beach clean. Initiated by Frank Atkinson and Willie Cilliers, who respectively settled here in 1969 and 1971 as two of the first permanent residents of Henties Bay.
The turnoff from the C34 is north of Fishermen’s Inn, 300m after the” Cape Cross 20km” sign and is indicated by a heap of rocks with an arrow painted in white. Follow the track for 7.4 km to black volcanic rocks on your right hand side (not marked). Please stop on the track and walk to this outcrop where you can view bright orange crustose lichens growing on the rocks and interesting rock formations. At an old rose quartz mine beautiful pink rose quartz chunks are still to be seen as it was sorted in size, but more interesting is the small outcrop where the rose quartz formation is very clearly visible. The Strathmore South tin mine is an old worked-out mine. Underground water filled up the excavation and due to the presence of various minerals the salinity is very high which causes one to float freely – from there the name “dead sea”. Locals claim it has healing properties. Please take extreme care when moving around the mine as the sediments are very brittle and unstable. From here you can follow any track back to the C34. The main track takes one past three old graves, conjuring up wild tales of miners and their hardship in a merciless desert environment, far from any civilization. This track is NOW graded but please do not exceed 40 km/h as dust is extremely damaging to lichens and the Welwitschia plants
Retire In Henties Active Aging Resort admin@hentiesbaygolfestate.com marketing@hentiesbaygolfestate.com +264 81 304 1907 For golf enquiries contact: Wolfie Hall +264 81 271 3830 Henties Bay, Erongo Region, Namibia
Henties Bay is a coastal town in the Erongo Region of western Namibia. It is located 70 km north of Swakopmund and is an important holiday settlement. 70 kilometres to the north of the town is the seal colony of Cape Cross. The town had 4,720 inhabitants in 2011, up from 3,285 in 2001
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HENTIES BAY GOLF RESORT
Enjoy Your Life Excellent and Awesome
THINGS TO DO AND SEE In and around 
Henties Bay
Bartolomeu Dias sailed along the Atlantic coast in 1488. Near the area of today's Henties Bay he discovered such an abundance of fish that he named this coastline Praia das Sardinhas, Coast of Fish. The fresh water source was first discovered by Schutztruppe soldiers in 1886. In 1920, a minerals prospector stayed overnight. After tasting the water he was said to be healed from an affliction.[4] The namesake of the town is major Hendrik "Henty" Stefanus van der Merwe who discovered the place in 1929 while looking for water. He had been hunting a rhinoceros in the arid hinterland of the Namibian coast near the Brandberg in order to collect a reward from a museum in Pennsylvania that was in search of a rhino skeleton. After shooting the rhino and scraping meat from the bones, water resources of the expedition diminished and forced the party to load the decomposing carcass and search for water.[5][6] They chose to head into the direction of the Atlantic coast and reached it close to Cape Cross. From there van der Merwe and his fellows searched southwards for the mouth of Omaruru River. A few miles south of the mouth they discovered a deep sand valley with reed grass growing in it, advertising the presence of fresh water. Van der Merwe liked the place and after delivering the bones and collecting his reward, returned the following Christmas to build a wooden hut in the riverbed. The place became known as Henty se baai (Henty's Bay) and developed into a holiday hideout,[5] mainly because of the abundance of fish at this spot.[4] In 1951 the South–West Africa Administration mandated to South Africa, proclaimed erven in the Omaruru riverbed that were available for rent, but the erection of permanent structures was not allowed. The first shop was established during that time. A lighthouse was erected to guide ships along the dangerous Namibian coast. In the 1960s mining holes were dug after diamonds had been found in the area on a few occasions. A few years later mining was abandoned due to lack of success. In 1966 it was decided that the riverbed must not be settled in, and property north and south of it was sold. A hotel was built one year later, and the town began to develop.[6]
Located about 15km south of Henties Bay is this wonderful shipwreck. The Zeila Shipwreck is an offshore fishing vessel that ran aground in 2008. Namibia’s infamous ‘Skeleton Coast’, also nicknamed the "The Land God Made in Anger", and "The Gates of Hell" is a desolate stretch of desert running right to the sea, where the cold Benguela current create strong currents, rough seas, and dense fogs. The latter in particular have been responsible for the thousand or so shipwrecks along the coast. A great photo-op, especially with the roosting birds that have taken up residence on it, the Zeila is a reminder of the power of nature at the ‘End of the Earth’ where lions hunt seals and elephants wade through the surf. The fishing trawler that was sold as scrap metal to an Indian company by Hangana Fishing of Walvis Bay got stranded after it came loose from its towing line while on its way to Bombay, India shortly after it left Walvis Bay.
 Since its earliest years Henties Bay was primarily an informal holiday settlement that gradually attracted more people every December who initially camped in tents but later on set up small informal wooden houses in the so-called valley, an old tribute of the Omaruru River. Because there was no infrastructure or somebody responsible for cleaning services, it was a battle trying to keep the area clean, probably leading to much bickering amongst holiday makers who are responsible for the mess and who should clean it up. Eventually in 1978 two of the first permanent residents of Henties Bay, Frank Atkinson and Willie Cilliers, who respectively settled here in 1969 and 1971, fixed an old tree stump with a rope and noose as a “friendly but firm” warning to keep the town and beach clean – or else….! This gesture is typical of Afrikaner humour and seen as such without any negative connotation reflecting on obscure happenings such as real hangings or slavery (which is, by the way, not part of Namibia’s history). The gallows, an interesting landmark for more than 20 years is probably the most photographed item in Henties Bay. It became a popular tourist attraction and in 2001 the Municipality had the following inscription affixed: Erected in 1978 as an appeal to keep the town and beach clean. Initiated by Frank Atkinson and Willie Cilliers, who respectively settled here in 1969 and 1971 as two of the first permanent residents of Henties Bay.
The turnoff from the C34 is north of Fishermen’s Inn, 300m after the” Cape Cross 20km” sign and is indicated by a heap of rocks with an arrow painted in white. Follow the track for 7.4 km to black volcanic rocks on your right hand side (not marked). Please stop on the track and walk to this outcrop where you can view bright orange crustose lichens growing on the rocks and interesting rock formations. At an old rose quartz mine beautiful pink rose quartz chunks are still to be seen as it was sorted in size, but more interesting is the small outcrop where the rose quartz formation is very clearly visible. The Strathmore South tin mine is an old worked-out mine. Underground water filled up the excavation and due to the presence of various minerals the salinity is very high which causes one to float freely – from there the name “dead sea”. Locals claim it has healing properties. Please take extreme care when moving around the mine as the sediments are very brittle and unstable. From here you can follow any track back to the C34. The main track takes one past three old graves, conjuring up wild tales of miners and their hardship in a merciless desert environment, far from any civilization. This track is NOW graded but please do not exceed 40 km/h as dust is extremely damaging to lichens and the Welwitschia plants
Retire In Henties Active Aging Resort admin@hentiesbaygolfestate.com marketing@hentiesbaygolfestate.com +264 81 304 1907 For golf enquiries contact: Wolfie Hall +264 81 271 3830 Henties Bay, Erongo Region, Namibia
Enjoy Your Life Excellent and Awesome
THINGS TO DO AND SEE In and around 
Henties Bay
Bartolomeu Dias sailed along the Atlantic coast in 1488. Near the area of today's Henties Bay he discovered such an abundance of fish that he named this coastline Praia das Sardinhas, Coast of Fish. The fresh water source was first discovered by Schutztruppe soldiers in 1886. In 1920, a minerals prospector stayed overnight. After tasting the water he was said to be healed from an affliction.[4] The namesake of the town is major Hendrik "Henty" Stefanus van der Merwe who discovered the place in 1929 while looking for water. He had been hunting a rhinoceros in the arid hinterland of the Namibian coast near the Brandberg in order to collect a reward from a museum in Pennsylvania that was in search of a rhino skeleton. After shooting the rhino and scraping meat from the bones, water resources of the expedition diminished and forced the party to load the decomposing carcass and search for water.[5][6] They chose to head into the direction of the Atlantic coast and reached it close to Cape Cross. From there van der Merwe and his fellows searched southwards for the mouth of Omaruru River. A few miles south of the mouth they discovered a deep sand valley with reed grass growing in it, advertising the presence of fresh water. Van der Merwe liked the place and after delivering the bones and collecting his reward, returned the following Christmas to build a wooden hut in the riverbed. The place became known as Henty se baai (Henty's Bay) and developed into a holiday hideout,[5] mainly because of the abundance of fish at this spot.[4] In 1951 the South–West Africa Administration mandated to South Africa, proclaimed erven in the Omaruru riverbed that were available for rent, but the erection of permanent structures was not allowed. The first shop was established during that time. A lighthouse was erected to guide ships along the dangerous Namibian coast. In the 1960s mining holes were dug after diamonds had been found in the area on a few occasions. A few years later mining was abandoned due to lack of success. In 1966 it was decided that the riverbed must not be settled in, and property north and south of it was sold. A hotel was built one year later, and the town began to develop.[6]
Located about 15km south of Henties Bay is this wonderful shipwreck. The Zeila Shipwreck is an offshore fishing vessel that ran aground in 2008. Namibia’s infamous ‘Skeleton Coast’, also nicknamed the "The Land God Made in Anger", and "The Gates of Hell" is a desolate stretch of desert running right to the sea, where the cold Benguela current create strong currents, rough seas, and dense fogs. The latter in particular have been responsible for the thousand or so shipwrecks along the coast. A great photo-op, especially with the roosting birds that have taken up residence on it, the Zeila is a reminder of the power of nature at the ‘End of the Earth’ where lions hunt seals and elephants wade through the surf. The fishing trawler that was sold as scrap metal to an Indian company by Hangana Fishing of Walvis Bay got stranded after it came loose from its towing line while on its way to Bombay, India shortly after it left Walvis Bay.
 Since its earliest years Henties Bay was primarily an informal holiday settlement that gradually attracted more people every December who initially camped in tents but later on set up small informal wooden houses in the so-called valley, an old tribute of the Omaruru River. Because there was no infrastructure or somebody responsible for cleaning services, it was a battle trying to keep the area clean, probably leading to much bickering amongst holiday makers who are responsible for the mess and who should clean it up. Eventually in 1978 two of the first permanent residents of Henties Bay, Frank Atkinson and Willie Cilliers, who respectively settled here in 1969 and 1971, fixed an old tree stump with a rope and noose as a “friendly but firm” warning to keep the town and beach clean – or else….! This gesture is typical of Afrikaner humour and seen as such without any negative connotation reflecting on obscure happenings such as real hangings or slavery (which is, by the way, not part of Namibia’s history). The gallows, an interesting landmark for more than 20 years is probably the most photographed item in Henties Bay. It became a popular tourist attraction and in 2001 the Municipality had the following inscription affixed: Erected in 1978 as an appeal to keep the town and beach clean. Initiated by Frank Atkinson and Willie Cilliers, who respectively settled here in 1969 and 1971 as two of the first permanent residents of Henties Bay.
The turnoff from the C34 is north of Fishermen’s Inn, 300m after the” Cape Cross 20km” sign and is indicated by a heap of rocks with an arrow painted in white. Follow the track for 7.4 km to black volcanic rocks on your right hand side (not marked). Please stop on the track and walk to this outcrop where you can view bright orange crustose lichens growing on the rocks and interesting rock formations. At an old rose quartz mine beautiful pink rose quartz chunks are still to be seen as it was sorted in size, but more interesting is the small outcrop where the rose quartz formation is very clearly visible. The Strathmore South tin mine is an old worked-out mine. Underground water filled up the excavation and due to the presence of various minerals the salinity is very high which causes one to float freely – from there the name “dead sea”. Locals claim it has healing properties. Please take extreme care when moving around the mine as the sediments are very brittle and unstable. From here you can follow any track back to the C34. The main track takes one past three old graves, conjuring up wild tales of miners and their hardship in a merciless desert environment, far from any civilization. This track is NOW graded but please do not exceed 40 km/h as dust is extremely damaging to lichens and the Welwitschia plants
Retire In Henties Active Aging Resort admin@hentiesbaygolfestate.com marketing@hentiesbaygolfestate.com +264 81 304 1907 For golf enquiries contact: Wolfie Hall +264 81 271 3830 Henties Bay, Erongo Region, Namibia
Henties Bay is a coastal town in the Erongo Region of western Namibia. It is located 70 km north of Swakopmund and is an important holiday settlement. 70 kilometres to the north of the town is the seal colony of Cape Cross. The town had 4,720 inhabitants in 2011, up from 3,285 in 2001
HENTIES BAY GOLF RESORT
Enjoy Your Life Excellent and Awesome
THINGS TO DO AND SEE In and around 
Henties Bay
Bartolomeu Dias sailed along the Atlantic coast in 1488. Near the area of today's Henties Bay he discovered such an abundance of fish that he named this coastline Praia das Sardinhas, Coast of Fish. The fresh water source was first discovered by Schutztruppe soldiers in 1886. In 1920, a minerals prospector stayed overnight. After tasting the water he was said to be healed from an affliction.[4] The namesake of the town is major Hendrik "Henty" Stefanus van der Merwe who discovered the place in 1929 while looking for water. He had been hunting a rhinoceros in the arid hinterland of the Namibian coast near the Brandberg in order to collect a reward from a museum in Pennsylvania that was in search of a rhino skeleton. After shooting the rhino and scraping meat from the bones, water resources of the expedition diminished and forced the party to load the decomposing carcass and search for water.[5][6] They chose to head into the direction of the Atlantic coast and reached it close to Cape Cross. From there van der Merwe and his fellows searched southwards for the mouth of Omaruru River. A few miles south of the mouth they discovered a deep sand valley with reed grass growing in it, advertising the presence of fresh water. Van der Merwe liked the place and after delivering the bones and collecting his reward, returned the following Christmas to build a wooden hut in the riverbed. The place became known as Henty se baai (Henty's Bay) and developed into a holiday hideout,[5] mainly because of the abundance of fish at this spot.[4] In 1951 the South–West Africa Administration mandated to South Africa, proclaimed erven in the Omaruru riverbed that were available for rent, but the erection of permanent structures was not allowed. The first shop was established during that time. A lighthouse was erected to guide ships along the dangerous Namibian coast. In the 1960s mining holes were dug after diamonds had been found in the area on a few occasions. A few years later mining was abandoned due to lack of success. In 1966 it was decided that the riverbed must not be settled in, and property north and south of it was sold. A hotel was built one year later, and the town began to develop.[6]
Located about 15km south of Henties Bay is this wonderful shipwreck. The Zeila Shipwreck is an offshore fishing vessel that ran aground in 2008. Namibia’s infamous ‘Skeleton Coast’, also nicknamed the "The Land God Made in Anger", and "The Gates of Hell" is a desolate stretch of desert running right to the sea, where the cold Benguela current create strong currents, rough seas, and dense fogs. The latter in particular have been responsible for the thousand or so shipwrecks along the coast. A great photo-op, especially with the roosting birds that have taken up residence on it, the Zeila is a reminder of the power of nature at the ‘End of the Earth’ where lions hunt seals and elephants wade through the surf. The fishing trawler that was sold as scrap metal to an Indian company by Hangana Fishing of Walvis Bay got stranded after it came loose from its towing line while on its way to Bombay, India shortly after it left Walvis Bay.
 Since its earliest years Henties Bay was primarily an informal holiday settlement that gradually attracted more people every December who initially camped in tents but later on set up small informal wooden houses in the so-called valley, an old tribute of the Omaruru River. Because there was no infrastructure or somebody responsible for cleaning services, it was a battle trying to keep the area clean, probably leading to much bickering amongst holiday makers who are responsible for the mess and who should clean it up. Eventually in 1978 two of the first permanent residents of Henties Bay, Frank Atkinson and Willie Cilliers, who respectively settled here in 1969 and 1971, fixed an old tree stump with a rope and noose as a “friendly but firm” warning to keep the town and beach clean – or else….! This gesture is typical of Afrikaner humour and seen as such without any negative connotation reflecting on obscure happenings such as real hangings or slavery (which is, by the way, not part of Namibia’s history). The gallows, an interesting landmark for more than 20 years is probably the most photographed item in Henties Bay. It became a popular tourist attraction and in 2001 the Municipality had the following inscription affixed: Erected in 1978 as an appeal to keep the town and beach clean. Initiated by Frank Atkinson and Willie Cilliers, who respectively settled here in 1969 and 1971 as two of the first permanent residents of Henties Bay.
The turnoff from the C34 is north of Fishermen’s Inn, 300m after the” Cape Cross 20km” sign and is indicated by a heap of rocks with an arrow painted in white. Follow the track for 7.4 km to black volcanic rocks on your right hand side (not marked). Please stop on the track and walk to this outcrop where you can view bright orange crustose lichens growing on the rocks and interesting rock formations. At an old rose quartz mine beautiful pink rose quartz chunks are still to be seen as it was sorted in size, but more interesting is the small outcrop where the rose quartz formation is very clearly visible. The Strathmore South tin mine is an old worked-out mine. Underground water filled up the excavation and due to the presence of various minerals the salinity is very high which causes one to float freely – from there the name “dead sea”. Locals claim it has healing properties. Please take extreme care when moving around the mine as the sediments are very brittle and unstable. From here you can follow any track back to the C34. The main track takes one past three old graves, conjuring up wild tales of miners and their hardship in a merciless desert environment, far from any civilization. This track is NOW graded but please do not exceed 40 km/h as dust is extremely damaging to lichens and the Welwitschia plants
HENTIES BAY GOLF RESORT
Enjoy Your Life Excellent and Awesome
THINGS TO DO AND SEE In and around 
Henties Bay
Bartolomeu Dias sailed along the Atlantic coast in 1488. Near the area of today's Henties Bay he discovered such an abundance of fish that he named this coastline Praia das Sardinhas, Coast of Fish. The fresh water source was first discovered by Schutztruppe soldiers in 1886. In 1920, a minerals prospector stayed overnight. After tasting the water he was said to be healed from an affliction.[4] The namesake of the town is major Hendrik "Henty" Stefanus van der Merwe who discovered the place in 1929 while looking for water. He had been hunting a rhinoceros in the arid hinterland of the Namibian coast near the Brandberg in order to collect a reward from a museum in Pennsylvania that was in search of a rhino skeleton. After shooting the rhino and scraping meat from the bones, water resources of the expedition diminished and forced the party to load the decomposing carcass and search for water.[5][6] They chose to head into the direction of the Atlantic coast and reached it close to Cape Cross. From there van der Merwe and his fellows searched southwards for the mouth of Omaruru River. A few miles south of the mouth they discovered a deep sand valley with reed grass growing in it, advertising the presence of fresh water. Van der Merwe liked the place and after delivering the bones and collecting his reward, returned the following Christmas to build a wooden hut in the riverbed. The place became known as Henty se baai (Henty's Bay) and developed into a holiday hideout,[5] mainly because of the abundance of fish at this spot.[4] In 1951 the South–West Africa Administration mandated to South Africa, proclaimed erven in the Omaruru riverbed that were available for rent, but the erection of permanent structures was not allowed. The first shop was established during that time. A lighthouse was erected to guide ships along the dangerous Namibian coast. In the 1960s mining holes were dug after diamonds had been found in the area on a few occasions. A few years later mining was abandoned due to lack of success. In 1966 it was decided that the riverbed must not be settled in, and property north and south of it was sold. A hotel was built one year later, and the town began to develop.[6]
Located about 15km south of Henties Bay is this wonderful shipwreck. The Zeila Shipwreck is an offshore fishing vessel that ran aground in 2008. Namibia’s infamous ‘Skeleton Coast’, also nicknamed the "The Land God Made in Anger", and "The Gates of Hell" is a desolate stretch of desert running right to the sea, where the cold Benguela current create strong currents, rough seas, and dense fogs. The latter in particular have been responsible for the thousand or so shipwrecks along the coast. A great photo-op, especially with the roosting birds that have taken up residence on it, the Zeila is a reminder of the power of nature at the ‘End of the Earth’ where lions hunt seals and elephants wade through the surf. The fishing trawler that was sold as scrap metal to an Indian company by Hangana Fishing of Walvis Bay got stranded after it came loose from its towing line while on its way to Bombay, India shortly after it left Walvis Bay.
 Since its earliest years Henties Bay was primarily an informal holiday settlement that gradually attracted more people every December who initially camped in tents but later on set up small informal wooden houses in the so-called valley, an old tribute of the Omaruru River. Because there was no infrastructure or somebody responsible for cleaning services, it was a battle trying to keep the area clean, probably leading to much bickering amongst holiday makers who are responsible for the mess and who should clean it up. Eventually in 1978 two of the first permanent residents of Henties Bay, Frank Atkinson and Willie Cilliers, who respectively settled here in 1969 and 1971, fixed an old tree stump with a rope and noose as a “friendly but firm” warning to keep the town and beach clean – or else….! This gesture is typical of Afrikaner humour and seen as such without any negative connotation reflecting on obscure happenings such as real hangings or slavery (which is, by the way, not part of Namibia’s history). The gallows, an interesting landmark for more than 20 years is probably the most photographed item in Henties Bay. It became a popular tourist attraction and in 2001 the Municipality had the following inscription affixed: Erected in 1978 as an appeal to keep the town and beach clean. Initiated by Frank Atkinson and Willie Cilliers, who respectively settled here in 1969 and 1971 as two of the first permanent residents of Henties Bay.
The turnoff from the C34 is north of Fishermen’s Inn, 300m after the” Cape Cross 20km” sign and is indicated by a heap of rocks with an arrow painted in white. Follow the track for 7.4 km to black volcanic rocks on your right hand side (not marked). Please stop on the track and walk to this outcrop where you can view bright orange crustose lichens growing on the rocks and interesting rock formations. At an old rose quartz mine beautiful pink rose quartz chunks are still to be seen as it was sorted in size, but more interesting is the small outcrop where the rose quartz formation is very clearly visible. The Strathmore South tin mine is an old worked-out mine. Underground water filled up the excavation and due to the presence of various minerals the salinity is very high which causes one to float freely – from there the name “dead sea”. Locals claim it has healing properties. Please take extreme care when moving around the mine as the sediments are very brittle and unstable. From here you can follow any track back to the C34. The main track takes one past three old graves, conjuring up wild tales of miners and their hardship in a merciless desert environment, far from any civilization. This track is NOW graded but please do not exceed 40 km/h as dust is extremely damaging to lichens and the Welwitschia plants
HENTIES BAY GOLF RESORT
Enjoy Your Life Excellent and Awesome
THINGS TO DO AND SEE In and around 
Henties Bay
Bartolomeu Dias sailed along the Atlantic coast in 1488. Near the area of today's Henties Bay he discovered such an abundance of fish that he named this coastline Praia das Sardinhas, Coast of Fish. The fresh water source was first discovered by Schutztruppe soldiers in 1886. In 1920, a minerals prospector stayed overnight. After tasting the water he was said to be healed from an affliction.[4] The namesake of the town is major Hendrik "Henty" Stefanus van der Merwe who discovered the place in 1929 while looking for water. He had been hunting a rhinoceros in the arid hinterland of the Namibian coast near the Brandberg in order to collect a reward from a museum in Pennsylvania that was in search of a rhino skeleton. After shooting the rhino and scraping meat from the bones, water resources of the expedition diminished and forced the party to load the decomposing carcass and search for water.[5][6] They chose to head into the direction of the Atlantic coast and reached it close to Cape Cross. From there van der Merwe and his fellows searched southwards for the mouth of Omaruru River. A few miles south of the mouth they discovered a deep sand valley with reed grass growing in it, advertising the presence of fresh water. Van der Merwe liked the place and after delivering the bones and collecting his reward, returned the following Christmas to build a wooden hut in the riverbed. The place became known as Henty se baai (Henty's Bay) and developed into a holiday hideout,[5] mainly because of the abundance of fish at this spot.[4] In 1951 the South–West Africa Administration mandated to South Africa, proclaimed erven in the Omaruru riverbed that were available for rent, but the erection of permanent structures was not allowed. The first shop was established during that time. A lighthouse was erected to guide ships along the dangerous Namibian coast. In the 1960s mining holes were dug after diamonds had been found in the area on a few occasions. A few years later mining was abandoned due to lack of success. In 1966 it was decided that the riverbed must not be settled in, and property north and south of it was sold. A hotel was built one year later, and the town began to develop.[6]
Located about 15km south of Henties Bay is this wonderful shipwreck. The Zeila Shipwreck is an offshore fishing vessel that ran aground in 2008. Namibia’s infamous ‘Skeleton Coast’, also nicknamed the "The Land God Made in Anger", and "The Gates of Hell" is a desolate stretch of desert running right to the sea, where the cold Benguela current create strong currents, rough seas, and dense fogs. The latter in particular have been responsible for the thousand or so shipwrecks along the coast. A great photo-op, especially with the roosting birds that have taken up residence on it, the Zeila is a reminder of the power of nature at the ‘End of the Earth’ where lions hunt seals and elephants wade through the surf. The fishing trawler that was sold as scrap metal to an Indian company by Hangana Fishing of Walvis Bay got stranded after it came loose from its towing line while on its way to Bombay, India shortly after it left Walvis Bay.
 Since its earliest years Henties Bay was primarily an informal holiday settlement that gradually attracted more people every December who initially camped in tents but later on set up small informal wooden houses in the so-called valley, an old tribute of the Omaruru River. Because there was no infrastructure or somebody responsible for cleaning services, it was a battle trying to keep the area clean, probably leading to much bickering amongst holiday makers who are responsible for the mess and who should clean it up. Eventually in 1978 two of the first permanent residents of Henties Bay, Frank Atkinson and Willie Cilliers, who respectively settled here in 1969 and 1971, fixed an old tree stump with a rope and noose as a “friendly but firm” warning to keep the town and beach clean – or else….! This gesture is typical of Afrikaner humour and seen as such without any negative connotation reflecting on obscure happenings such as real hangings or slavery (which is, by the way, not part of Namibia’s history). The gallows, an interesting landmark for more than 20 years is probably the most photographed item in Henties Bay. It became a popular tourist attraction and in 2001 the Municipality had the following inscription affixed: Erected in 1978 as an appeal to keep the town and beach clean. Initiated by Frank Atkinson and Willie Cilliers, who respectively settled here in 1969 and 1971 as two of the first permanent residents of Henties Bay.
The turnoff from the C34 is north of Fishermen’s Inn, 300m after the” Cape Cross 20km” sign and is indicated by a heap of rocks with an arrow painted in white. Follow the track for 7.4 km to black volcanic rocks on your right hand side (not marked). Please stop on the track and walk to this outcrop where you can view bright orange crustose lichens growing on the rocks and interesting rock formations. At an old rose quartz mine beautiful pink rose quartz chunks are still to be seen as it was sorted in size, but more interesting is the small outcrop where the rose quartz formation is very clearly visible. The Strathmore South tin mine is an old worked-out mine. Underground water filled up the excavation and due to the presence of various minerals the salinity is very high which causes one to float freely – from there the name “dead sea”. Locals claim it has healing properties. Please take extreme care when moving around the mine as the sediments are very brittle and unstable. From here you can follow any track back to the C34. The main track takes one past three old graves, conjuring up wild tales of miners and their hardship in a merciless desert environment, far from any civilization. This track is NOW graded but please do not exceed 40 km/h as dust is extremely damaging to lichens and the Welwitschia plants
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THINGS TO DO AND SEE In and around 
Henties Bay
Bartolomeu Dias sailed along the Atlantic coast in 1488. Near the area of today's Henties Bay he discovered such an abundance of fish that he named this coastline Praia das Sardinhas, Coast of Fish. The fresh water source was first discovered by Schutztruppe soldiers in 1886. In 1920, a minerals prospector stayed overnight. After tasting the water he was said to be healed from an affliction.[4] The namesake of the town is major Hendrik "Henty" Stefanus van der Merwe who discovered the place in 1929 while looking for water. He had been hunting a rhinoceros in the arid hinterland of the Namibian coast near the Brandberg in order to collect a reward from a museum in Pennsylvania that was in search of a rhino skeleton. After shooting the rhino and scraping meat from the bones, water resources of the expedition diminished and forced the party to load the decomposing carcass and search for water.[5][6] They chose to head into the direction of the Atlantic coast and reached it close to Cape Cross. From there van der Merwe and his fellows searched southwards for the mouth of Omaruru River. A few miles south of the mouth they discovered a deep sand valley with reed grass growing in it, advertising the presence of fresh water. Van der Merwe liked the place and after delivering the bones and collecting his reward, returned the following Christmas to build a wooden hut in the riverbed. The place became known as Henty se baai (Henty's Bay) and developed into a holiday hideout,[5] mainly because of the abundance of fish at this spot.[4] In 1951 the South–West Africa Administration mandated to South Africa, proclaimed erven in the Omaruru riverbed that were available for rent, but the erection of permanent structures was not allowed. The first shop was established during that time. A lighthouse was erected to guide ships along the dangerous Namibian coast. In the 1960s mining holes were dug after diamonds had been found in the area on a few occasions. A few years later mining was abandoned due to lack of success. In 1966 it was decided that the riverbed must not be settled in, and property north and south of it was sold. A hotel was built one year later, and the town began to develop.[6]
Located about 15km south of Henties Bay is this wonderful shipwreck. The Zeila Shipwreck is an offshore fishing vessel that ran aground in 2008. Namibia’s infamous ‘Skeleton Coast’, also nicknamed the "The Land God Made in Anger", and "The Gates of Hell" is a desolate stretch of desert running right to the sea, where the cold Benguela current create strong currents, rough seas, and dense fogs. The latter in particular have been responsible for the thousand or so shipwrecks along the coast. A great photo-op, especially with the roosting birds that have taken up residence on it, the Zeila is a reminder of the power of nature at the ‘End of the Earth’ where lions hunt seals and elephants wade through the surf. The fishing trawler that was sold as scrap metal to an Indian company by Hangana Fishing of Walvis Bay got stranded after it came loose from its towing line while on its way to Bombay, India shortly after it left Walvis Bay.
 Since its earliest years Henties Bay was primarily an informal holiday settlement that gradually attracted more people every December who initially camped in tents but later on set up small informal wooden houses in the so-called valley, an old tribute of the Omaruru River. Because there was no infrastructure or somebody responsible for cleaning services, it was a battle trying to keep the area clean, probably leading to much bickering amongst holiday makers who are responsible for the mess and who should clean it up. Eventually in 1978 two of the first permanent residents of Henties Bay, Frank Atkinson and Willie Cilliers, who respectively settled here in 1969 and 1971, fixed an old tree stump with a rope and noose as a “friendly but firm” warning to keep the town and beach clean – or else….! This gesture is typical of Afrikaner humour and seen as such without any negative connotation reflecting on obscure happenings such as real hangings or slavery (which is, by the way, not part of Namibia’s history). The gallows, an interesting landmark for more than 20 years is probably the most photographed item in Henties Bay. It became a popular tourist attraction and in 2001 the Municipality had the following inscription affixed: Erected in 1978 as an appeal to keep the town and beach clean. Initiated by Frank Atkinson and Willie Cilliers, who respectively settled here in 1969 and 1971 as two of the first permanent residents of Henties Bay.
The turnoff from the C34 is north of Fishermen’s Inn, 300m after the” Cape Cross 20km” sign and is indicated by a heap of rocks with an arrow painted in white. Follow the track for 7.4 km to black volcanic rocks on your right hand side (not marked). Please stop on the track and walk to this outcrop where you can view bright orange crustose lichens growing on the rocks and interesting rock formations. At an old rose quartz mine beautiful pink rose quartz chunks are still to be seen as it was sorted in size, but more interesting is the small outcrop where the rose quartz formation is very clearly visible. The Strathmore South tin mine is an old worked-out mine. Underground water filled up the excavation and due to the presence of various minerals the salinity is very high which causes one to float freely – from there the name “dead sea”. Locals claim it has healing properties. Please take extreme care when moving around the mine as the sediments are very brittle and unstable. From here you can follow any track back to the C34. The main track takes one past three old graves, conjuring up wild tales of miners and their hardship in a merciless desert environment, far from any civilization. This track is NOW graded but please do not exceed 40 km/h as dust is extremely damaging to lichens and the Welwitschia plants
Retire In Henties Active Aging Resort admin@hentiesbaygolfestate.com marketing@hentiesbaygolfestate.com +264 81 304 1907 For golf enquiries contact: Wolfie Hall +264 81 271 3830 Henties Bay, Erongo Region, Namibia
HENTIES BAY GOLF RESORT